What to Expect When You’re Expecting AND Vaccines

Protect yourself and your growing baby, avoid vaccinations during pregnancy.

Pregnancy DiabetesI remember when I became pregnant I read “What to Expect When You’re Expecting.” This book had many useful tips on the changes your body will go through, cravings, week-by-week growth, and one page on vaccinations. Of course, this book took the approach that vaccines for a pregnant woman and her growing baby are safe and effective. It does say that live viruses are not good for a pregnant woman, but that the Tdap, flu, and Hep-B are perfectly safe. The same goes for the Center for Disease Control (CDC) which states “The CDC wants you to know that vaccines are an important part of a healthy pregnancy. Certain diseases can be very serious for you and your developing baby during your pregnancy. Getting vaccines during your pregnancy can help protect you both and provide your newborn with some early disease protection.”(https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pregnancy/downloads/what-to-expect.pdf)

A recent study was featured on The Today Show headed by Dr. James Donahue an epidemiologist at the Marshfield Clinic in Wisconsin. Note this study was also funded by the CDC. It studied pregnant women who received the flu shot in combination with the H1N1 vaccine over the 2010-12 flu season. Results showed that 485 women had spontaneous miscarriages 1-28 days following that combination. “The overall aOR in the 28-day window was 2.0, or double the risk, but those findings, in contrast to the H1N1 subset, were not statistically significant. There was no association seen in any other exposure window.” They have decided to continue vaccinating pregnant women even after the evidence was profound that these vaccines caused “Double The Risk” of miscarriage and stillbirth. The CDC has decided to disregard the findings of this study and continue to administer the flu shot to pregnant women. The study is ongoing, however, it’s initial findings are evident, yet the CDC vaccinates.

My question to the CDC is why are you not holding off on killing children so that you can do further research on the connection between vaccines and pregnant women? Any other medication goes through strenuous testing and research trials, but vaccines have never been tested in combination with each other, nor has the entire vaccine schedule been tested as a whole. Why do scientists, health officials, and drug companies spend so much more on research regarding Viagara than it does on testing vaccines that are injected into pregnant women and children?

2017-10-23_0516In September 2012 Dr. Gary Goldman released a study in the Human and Environmental Toxicology Journal (HET) “Reporting a 4,250 percent increase in the number of miscarriages and stillbirths reported to Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) in the 2009/2010 flu season. For those not familiar with VAERS, this is a database setup for physicians and patients to report vaccine-related death and injuries. However, this data has to be skewed because only 10% of vaccine-related injury and fatalities are reported to VAERS, so the number should be higher.

If the CDC will not hold-off on vaccinating pregnant women until they complete their research, then we are all truly test subjects awaiting their results. We have not voluntarily signed up for this research and women should be appalled they are used in this manner. My advice to pregnant women is not to get vaccinated during pregnancy until the CDC can complete their studies and research and provide a definitive outcome. Don’t let your unborn baby be a statistic. If you want to improve your pregnancy, do so with diet, exercise, and avoidance of environmental toxins. Don’t let anyone else determine what is safe and effective for your baby when they haven’t even completed the research to be able to make that statement.

Resources:

Goldman, G. (2013). Comparison of VAERS fetal-loss reports during three consecutive influenza seasons: Was there a synergistic fetal toxicity associated with the two-vaccine 2009/2010 season? Human & Experimental Toxicology32(5), 464–475. http://doi.org/10.1177/0960327112455067